England legend Lawrence Dallaglio accused of spending ‘£10,000 in London brothel’, court hears

Lawrence Dallaglio’s name unexpectedly came up in court yesterday.

Following a lengthy investigation, Dallaglio’s name emerged as detectives trawled through 180,000 transactions, a jury heard.

His alleged visits were revealed during the trial of a gang that was accused of providing prostitutes and the class A drugs inside the establishment, The Sun reported. 

The 47-year-old is accused of spending money from his own bank cards during visits to a discrete Georgian townhouse in Holborn, London, which also offered clients cocaine, an open court heard. 

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According to The Sun, the receipts, which were unearthed inside a bag located in the basement, showed that Dallaglio had made four payments which totalled to £10,550 on March 22 last year – however  he has not been arrested and it was never established what he paid for.

During the six-week trial at Wood Green crown court, North London, the father-of-two was not called to give evidence.


10 of the Biggest scandals in rugby history

Rugby Union has had its fair share of controversial moments down the years.

1. KAMP STAALDRAAD

It was a military-style “boot camp” organized as a “team building” exercise for the South African national rugby union team, the Springboks (or Boks), during their preparation for the 2003 Rugby World Cup (RWC). Details of the camp emerged in the South African media, resulting in protest from the upper administrative levels of South African rugby.

  • The team was ordered to climb into a foxhole naked and sing the national anthem while ice-cold water were being poured over their heads. During their time in the hole, recordings of God Save the Queen (used as England‘s national anthem) and the New Zealand All Blacks haka were played at full volume.
  • It was confirmed that firearms were present at the camp, although reports varied as to whether they were ever pointed at anyone.
  • The players were forced to crawl naked across gravel.
  • They also were ordered to spend a night in the bush, during which they were to kill and cook chickens, but not eat them.

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